Truth in Sentencing: Receiving Credit for Time Served Outside of Jail-EHM v. Pretrial Services

When an individual is charged with a crime and awaiting trial, they are subject to pretrial detention. While most people perceive the notion of pretrial detention as being in custody at the county jail, there are other forms of pretrial detention that don’t require an individual to necessarily be incarcerated.

While someone is in custody in jail awaiting disposition of their case, they receive credit for time served in jail for any sentence of prison time imposed by a plea of guilty or finding of guilty. (Ex. A person who serves one year in jail would have that time subtracted from a prison sentence of 2 years thus leaving 1 year).  The calculation should be made from the day of the individual’s arrest to the day of the disposition of their case.  All individuals in custody of Cook County Jail are eligible for time served credit with a few exceptions ranging from committing a crime while in custody to receiving a natural life sentence.

However, time served can be extended to another form of pretrial detention outside of Cook County Jail. Another form of pretrial detention where an individual could receive credit for time served is known as EHM (Electronic Home Monitoring).  EHM is sometimes known to the general public as “House Arrest” or “Home Confinement.” This form of pretrial detention requires an individual to wear an ankle bracelet that monitors their movements.  Typically, the individual is confined to their home for the duration of their case. In some instances, the individual is allowed movement outside of the home for limited purposes including going to work, church, doctor’s appointments, ect. This form of pretrial detention is typically governed under the control of the Sheriff’s Department.  Being under the supervision of the Sheriff’s Department considers the individual to be “in custody” for the purposes of time served.

This form for pretrial detention should not be confused with GPS monitoring through pretrial services. GPS monitoring requires an individual to wear a GPS monitor on their ankle.  The purpose of the GPS monitor allows pretrial to monitor the individual’s movements.  A GPS is typically fitted to keep an individual away from a specific person or place that is the subject of the charged offense.  The individual however would not be eligible for time served in this situation.  Since the GPS monitor is governed by pretrial services, a person is not considered to be “in custody” for these purposes.  Since an individual on a GPS is free from any actual detention and their freedom is not “restricted” under the supervision of pretrial services, they are not considered in custody for the purposes of time served.

However, it should be noted that being on EHM does not necessarily guarantee an individual will receive credit for time served. There are exceptions that disqualify an individual from receiving credit for time served on EHM.  The main exception to the specific offense the individual is on EHM for.  If an offense falls under 730 ILCS 5/5-5-3, then the offense would not qualify for time served credit under EHM.  For example, a person on EHM for a pending charge of Criminal Sexual Assault would NOT be eligible for sentencing credit due to the nature of the offense enumerated under 730 ILCS 5/5-5-3.

When someone is on EHM while awaiting trial, they should consult with their experienced criminal defense attorney regarding the issue of time served. This is an important aspect that should be analyzed when evaluating the issue of time served when an individual is considering entering a plea of guilty or evaluating the amount of time a person is facing if they lose at trial.  This analysis is critical when determining the course of action to take in that individual’s case and should be conducted in a meticulous and detailed manner.

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